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This paper deals with the normal more than the exceptional. The norms for the region can be stated as follows :. People greatly valued songs as exact, memorized preservations of language ;.

They dreamed new songs but not new myths ;. And neither did they dream songs of, or from, the events that they narrated in myths.

The attested exceptions will be confined to the last two points, in fact to the last point2. We turn now briefly to the second of Herzog's evocative phrases, the discussion of which will underline the importance that I attach to memorization.

The phrase is " the music of song versus the music of speech " With it he called attention to the ever interesting question of the debt that a local singing tradition, for example a preference for a certain type of melody, owes to the prosody and sound pattern of the local spoken language.

I mention this idea in order to state how I will place a special construal upon it. The pages that follow will treat a set of three Pima-Papago southern Arizona dream songs in some detail, but I will attend more to the songs' grammar and syntax, and to the stories told in the texts, than to their melodies, intonation, rhythm, and sound inventory.

I do so on the theory that literature among all peoples is a means to preserve spans of meaningful language ; that this preservation must be in memory among oral peoples ; and that, as stated above, these peoples used song for that purpose.

This isn't to dispute the possible influence of speech upon song. I affirm that influence in holding that the purpose of songs — these songs — is to store knowledge in language.

But I will emphasize the grammar and story in that language more than the melody. Song as literature and as memory.

I propose that tribal peoples, that is, oral peoples, peoples without writing, set some of their literature to music because they want to remember what the literature says, and they find that thoughts set to music are highly memorable.

If this seems like an origin story of music, I accept that and will now modify it just slightly. It is not that there was first literature discourse, story , and some of that literature was set to music for safekeeping in memory.

Rather, slightly differently, there were first thoughts and utterances that pleased and moved people, and oral literature, including song, arose as a means to fix those thoughts in memorable, recoverable, safekeeping forms.

Thus I am giving an origin of literature, but of literature in a. Before discussing the rigors of memorization we must note that this definition excludes two types of language art from literature : completely improvisational, ephemeral statements, that is, statements that are not really meant for keeping 3 ; and statements that lack or are perceived to lack meaningful words, e.

I don't exclude them haughtily, but from a desire to focus on this nearly banal quality of most of the things that we call literature, that they are intentionally kept stretches of meaningful words 4.

What is banal for us, however, with our power of writing, is precious to people where everything, and the only thing, is memory.

In Native America generally, songs usually occupy one of three levels of rigor in memorization. This is the level of letter perfect sound for sound recall.

Not surprisingly, the works committed to this most rigorous memorization are short. Thus, the songs of this dream tradition are typically about half a minute long, but they are repeated several times in each singing.

They are never sung singly, but always in series hence Herzog's term, dreamt song series. They seem to be designed so that an audience will readily know if the singer has memorized them properly.

They are " tricky " in execution, with syncopation and odd turns of pronunciation, and whoever stumbles in a repeated singing has failed the test of memorization.

A memorization level slightly laxer than songs is occupied in Native America by texts that we call chants, prayers, spells, and orations.

These attain either word-for-word less rigorous than sound-for-sound memorization, or they exhibit what Milman Parry and Albert Lord called " oral formulaic " memorization e.

Such texts typically range in length from five minutes to half an hour. Above that level are the longest and least rigorously memorized texts, which I call " prose.

They are told in ordinary speaking voice, not sung or chanted. They can last for over an hour and they may be parts of an organized whole tribal mythic history which would reach book length if fully told.

Such texts are memorized at the level of the episode : the teller is sure to give the essential and true narrative facts, but there is no guarantee, or even intent, that the teller will repeat exactly the same words that were said in a previous telling.

The texts are paraphrased on each performance. One must say that this is a kind of memorization, but of episodes 6.

To conclude : the principal genres of Native American oral literature fall into a scale of memorization.

Implicit in this is the idea that literature is precious. Only a small portion of what people in oral societies know and say is committed to literature.

One wonders, why those things? I have no answer, but only an approach to the question. We should think of the levels as shelves, and study them in interaction : why this into song and that into prose, and in this case what has dreaming to do with it?

The key documents relative to the exceptional, ancient time version of the dream culture are certain very long series of songs with accompanying prose.

There is only one complete written version of such a text, that is, a version with both the songs and the prose. It is a Yuma myth called Lightning that was taken down by A.

Halpern and excerpted for publication under the name of the singer, William Wilson Before we discuss that text and others like it Halpern kindly gave me a copy of the full version , I wish to introduce, interpret, and analyze a very short series from the Papago or Tohono O'odham singer John Lewis, of Gunsight Village, Arizona.

We will pay particular attention to the way that these proseless songs tell a story. They leave the story to the imagination of the hearer, or reader.

I believe that this was the norm for the region, which raises one more issue on norms and exceptions, whether and why a dreamed song series would have accompanying prose.

We will explore this by means of the Airplane and Lightning sets at the end of the paper. The songs are said to have been dreamed from overheard from an airplane, in the s.

Lewis did not dream them himself, but learned them from the dreamer while they both worked at farms near Gila Bend, Arizona.

Gila Bend is mentioned in the first song, for there was a small Army Air Corps training field there, which attracted the plane. Thus the series is of modern inspiration.

Its use, however, was traditional : it was danced to. On weekends the Indians in the farm labor camp would sing the songs and dance to them.

The Lightning songs were also danced to, as I believe were all dream song series 8. We will discuss these dances as narrative or literary performances at the end of the paper.

At intervals during the Airplane dances, Lewis said, the song dreamer passed out chocolates to his helpers. These were snacks, the occasion was lighthearted.

The idea was to imitate pilots who were understood to eat chocolate while flying, for alertness.

Lewis said that there were many more songs than the three he remembered, but as we will see the three suggest an ordered whole. Writing conventions.

Before giving the songs I will explain my method for writing and translating them. Readers uninterested in technicalities can skip this section, which concerns how my method differs from standard musical practice.

The songs are freely but accurately translated in capital letters in the next section. Standard practice uses notes on a musical staff.

Vertical position on the staff indicates a sound's pitch, while a sound's duration is shown by the design of the notes half note, quarter note, etc.

A sound's articulate status what sort of vowel or consonant it is is shown with letters written beneath the musical staff.

If the sounds are translated into another language, that language e. Rather, the translation is written as a separate poem.

The words are written as if spoken in prose, that is, in what Herzog called the " music of speech. The standard method of song transcription uses the vertical location of notes on a staff to represent real tonal differences, but it does not use horizontal distance to represent duration.

The note designs " full, " " half, " etc give that information. Song phrases are indicated by measure bars. My method of writing songs shows temporal duration by the horizontal placement of syllables.

The syllables are deployed relative to evenly placed " beat marks " ictus points. But if this method has an advantage relative to duration, it also loses something.

It dispenses with notes and, in the transcription given here, with information on melody or tone. A standard notation with that information is given in an appendix written by J.

Richard Haefer. I thank him for doing what I could not notate the songs and for his consultations on the tonal contours of the songs' key metered zones.

Those zones are the most regulated portions of a song. Papago songs have lines of varying length, but each line has within it a highly regularized zone.

This portion or zone is defined in the first place by a pattern of apportioning syllables to beats.

In the present set songs vary in this the pattern places three syllables over two beats as follows :. Ideally, there are as many lines in a song as there are instances of the pattern.

In fact it is not quite so simple, for there are nonmetrical matters to consider, and these usually give good reason to establish fewer lines than there are occurences of the pattern.

A line may have more than one occurence, but one of the instances, when all things are considered, will be judged the true key zone for that line.

The identification of the zones affects the writing of the songs : the zones are placed in vertical alignment.

And since the lines themselves are of varying lengths, the column of zones makes a song appear cantilevered, with varying amounts of " unregulated " material deployed to the right and left of the column.

A comment is needed on the cultural reality of key zones and song lines. The Papagos say that a song has a " beginning " son , an " end " ku:g , and an internal point of " turning " nodag , the last referring to a kind of repetition where the repeated portion does not equal the fullest rendition of the song 9.

I do not think that they had or now have terms equivalent to the concepts of " line " and " key zone ".

They are not unusual among tribal peoples in this regard. Although lines are fundamental in all written ethnopoetic analyses " key zone " is my own concept , I have not heard of a native people with an explicit notion of the same.

These peoples clearly have terminologies suitable for creating, or dreaming, and learning and singing songs. If they lack technical notions like line and key zone, this may be because they do not write their songs.

The songs. The beats of the key metered zone are marked with asterisks, the other beats have ictus points. See Appendix 2 for spelling conventions and Appendix 3 on native ordinary language versions and the translations.

Song 1. Ga mu ka li fo na je je we ame jede hi me da. Ga mu hi la wine je je we da mane yu nu ke. Native Ordinary and Literal English Renditions.

Am Aux[l sing, imperf] high goer,. Aux[l sing, imperf] I high goer. Gam hu Kalifona jewed amjed him, Away California land from go,.

Gam hu Kalifona jewed amjed him. Away California land from go. Gam hu Hila:wi jewed da:m hud, Away Gila Bend land above descend,. Gam hu Hila:wi jewed da:m hud.

Away Gila Bend land above descend. Song 2. Native Ordinary and Literal English Versions. And Aux[l, sing, imperf] here come out and low go,.

And Aux[l, sing, imperf] here come out and low go. Gam hu Aho du'ag da:m sikol him, Away Ajo mountain above circling go,.

Gam hu Aho du'ag da:m sikol him, Away Ajo mountain above circling go. Song 3. Sa poi ku ku na he si wode me me he. Native Ordinary and Literal English versions.

Mukul du'ag jewed hogid an ke:k, Mukul mountain earth edge there stand,. And Aux[i, sing, imperf] it reach. And Auxfi, sing, imperf] it reach.

Interpretation of story, analysis of means. We begin with a discussion of how the three songs in sequence assimilate a modern airplane into an established dream song rubric on shamanic journeying.

After the narrative analysis we discuss the role of the key zone in the songs : that it corresponds to a single grammatical adverbial and syntactic next-to-last category, and that it has a musical meter, rhyme, and tone identity.

Near Gila Bend was an air field where, as the first song says, planes landed on flights from California. The field still exists by this small desert town.

The mountain name probably preceded the town which dates from the turn of the century. Lewis's home is near the mountain and so perhaps was the home of the dreamer, but I have heard the mountain mentioned in Pima songs, dreamed from birds rather than airplanes.

The Pima singers were unfamiliar with the actual mountain. The " I " in this set is an airplane that started from California, flew to and descended at Gila Bend, and then flew to and circled above Ajo Mountain.

Finally in the last song the plane flies to a destination that I believe no waking person has seen, and whose very name, Mukul, I have not heard interpreted in Pima-Papago or translated into English.

According to Lewis the mountain is at the edge of the world in a southeasterly direction from Ajo Mountain.

This puts it in roughly the same orientation to Ajo Mountain as that mountain is to Gila Bend. The song says that a fire burns at Mukul's tip, and the plane arrives there.

The fire, Lewis says, is an airplane beacon. Each line of each song is a complete sentence, simple or complex.

The set has a total of 16 lines, but there are really only eight different ones because each line. Almost every line ends in a verb. There is one more verb out of the final position.

Song 2's duplicated first line is a sentence with two clauses. The line ends with " go ", but begins with a clause whose verb is " come out ".

Also concerning the verbs, we see that the eighteen verbal positions are filled with just seven verbs : " am ", " go ", " descend ", " come out ", " stand ", " burn ", and " reach ".

Margot Astrov her special interest was the Navajo long ago noted the prevalence of such words in Native American literatures.

Finally on the verbs, note that the exceptional first line of song 1 ends with a play on the verb " go ". Immediately before the final verb comes the key metered zone.

It is regularly filled by an adverb. Some of these are paired with nouns to form adverbial phrases the adverbial words are then called " post positions " — Zepeda, : : " earth from, " " earth upon, " " mountain upon ", and " earth beside ".

One adverb is hidden but implied in an auxiliary plus a pronoun song 3, roughly speaking " and I to it ". And four are normal, simple adverbs : " high ", " low ", " circling ", and " flaming ".

There is one more syntactical position in this set's formula. Prior to the noun phrase and at the start of each line is an auxiliary, either a " subject complex word " see the appendix on translation or a " locative auxiliary.

What is notable about this syntactic form? First, it is not required by Papago ordinary language. In fact, the one strict rule that has been formulated for ordinary Papago word order is that a subject complex auxiliary must always occur in second position in a sentence Zepeda, : The set's formula violates that rule.

When its sentences have auxiliaries, they come in the first position. This is surely not the only syntactic sequence that occurs in Papago and Pima songs these are the same people linguistically and musically , but the range of these sequences is not known.

The sole clear general principle of the people's songs is that lines tend to end in verbs. Second, leaving aside what the songs regularly include, they are also notable for what they leave out.

They tend to leave out the grammatical subjects of their sentences and therefore the identities of the actors or heroes of their stories.

Thus, although these three songs are heavy with nouns, the nouns are not the subjects of sentences or the doers of actions. Rather, the nouns name things or places that the.

Song 3 is a partial exception. It has a substantive noun " Mukul mountain " 10 as its subject.

It ends, however, with the familiar brief " I. Almost all the verbs are intransitive, thus they lack direct objects. The nouns are more loosely objects, however, being the travel destinations of the " I.

The three rules or tendencies combine to produce a subjective, action oriented, pictorial and shamanic poetry. The " I " is like a camera recording what it sees.

The point of the set, I think, is that the plane is like a shaman or medicine man because it reaches the edge of the world and finds something burning there.

Thus it is the last song that transforms the set from a merely amusing piece on airplanes into a piece on shamanism.

The songs used by Pima-Papago shamans for divination and curing generally feature first person journeys, and the journeys commonly involve light Russell, : : ; Underbill, : ; Bahr, and Here is an example, also preoccupied with flying, from John Lewis :.

It is little winged turtle and here descends. It is little winged turtle and here descends,. Here to me stretches, away eastward leads me.

Here to me stretches, away eastward leads me,. Here to me stretches, away children's burial inside I enter,. The " east " refers to the land of the dead, the children's burial is the place of a mythic child sacrifice.

The " I, " either a ghost or a shaman, is illuminated after entering that underground place Bahr, We turn now to the music, with special attention to the key zones.

Metrically this zone approximately corresponds to the instances where three syllables are apportioned over two beats full beat, then two half beats.

There are twelve such instances within the zone four times the zone has exceptional four syllable apportionments : lines 3 and 4 of song 1, and 1 and 2 of song 3 ; and there are 12 occurences outside it.

Eight of the exceptions are contiguous with the zone songs 2 and 3 , and we may say that they mimic it. I cannot explain the other four.

The key zone comprises a column of controlled phonetic variation, in other words of rhyme. There is no doubt that the words that occupy the zone have been modified from ordinary speech for the sake of rhyme.

The key zone of song 2 is the clearest example n. The first syllables do not rhyme, but the last two do.

The second syllable is a stack of " ma's, " and the third has the constant vowel " e " with differences in consonants.

The ordinary language sources of these words are jumal and da:m, a two and a one syllable word. The initial syllables of those words are kept true, but the final syllables are rhymed.

Is the key zone the prime locus for rhyming? I suspect that. Now tone. More often than not, the key zone, if of three syllables, has the tonal configuration Hi Lo Hi ; and if the zone has four syllables the configuation is Hi Hi Lo Hi.

Although the absolute pitch values vary from line to line see Haefer's musical notation in the appendix , the Hi's in each instance are of the same pitch, so the configuration is a pitch, a drop, and a resumption of the original pitch.

This pattern holds for twelve of the sixteen key zones, and it occurs four times outside a zone.

If the key zone is musically distinct, it is also pinpointed. Therefore we should not expect it to capture the full play of linguistic meaning in a song.

As we have seen, the key zone consists of adverbs, but these are not what make the narratives interesting.

In my opinion, the narratives are interesting because of their concealed first personness, their supression of grammatical subject nouns, and the suggestion of shamanism.

Those complexities are not contained in the key zones. Nor could they be. The key zones, while meaningful, are not poems.

They attest to memorization but they do not hold the secret of a text. This is the story of one hero's journeying, generally in the company of three other individuals one of whom dreamed the songs.

The dreamer, who was the singer William Wilson's father, is not mentioned in the text. Wilson explained to Halpern that his father was present as a silent witness and over hearer of the songs.

Wilson's prose then is a paraphrase of his father's prose account of what happened, but the songs that Wilson sang are taken as the exact words sung by the mythical hero, named Wonder Boy.

He becomes thunder and lightning at the end of the story. Also present during parts of the journey, but silent, are Coyote and Marxo Kwave untranslated , the orignal ancestor not creator of the Yuma.

Each of the songs supposedly originated in the journey. Thus the text qualifies as an exception by the fourth criterion stated at the beginning of the paper — new songs — but not by the third — new myth.

I say this because Wonder Boy observed and sang about mythic events that the Yumas already knew ; he came upon them and burst into song.

In so doing he was as much an observer as the dreamer whom he guided and sang to. He did not affect the events, or analyze them, but simply acknowledged them as the following example will illustrate.

An important event in Yuma mythology is the death and cremation of a creator god named Kukumat. Here with brackets by me and parentheses by Halpern is a part of the event as rendered in Lightning.

First comes prose, then a song :. Thus saying [by the dying god Kukumat], " I have finished the story " he is saying.

Now he is really about to take a turn for the worse [die], and has he [Wonder Boy] is looking at him there, " Well, I will admit my fail ure , " he [Kukumat] said, then the sick man [K] said, " Well, I am about to pass away.

Come really closer [said to all the creatures assembled, including the journeyers], surround me and look at me!

And he [WB] stood there describing it again [singing a song for the dreamer to hear]. Halpern, n. The Lightning text is not a new myth in the sense of a new or revised insight into the foundation events of the Yuma.

It is an old myth revisited and commented upon by Wonder Boy for a Yuma dreamer's benefit. The text's plot as a whole is quite like the much shorter Airplane series : a hero and his entourage travel and the hero sings songs in the process.

The prose part lacking in the Papago mostly tells where the hero moved next. Conclusion : Myth and Dream Song. This final section reflects on the facts that the Lightning songs, while giving testimony of a dreamed visit to mythic time, deliver that testimony in a mixture of prose and song ; that the Airplane songs, giving testimony to a lesser feat of the soul, tell their story in pure song ; that for all their brevity the Papago songs tell more of a story than the Yuma songs alone, that is, the Yuma songs when stripped of their prose ; and that beneath those differences there lies a common use for dream songs, to sing them at dances with no prose explanation.

In this use the Yuma songs make no textual sense. They only make if one knows the prose : that of the dreamer and that of the myths that he walked in on.

Before we begin, I will review the extent of ancient myth dreaming in the region. It is not reported elsewhere, and I doubt that it has been missed.

Kroeber published the prose portions of many such Mojave myths, but he omitted the songs , William Kelly published the prose but not the songs of a Cocopa myth of this sort As for dream songs of the normal sort, from peoples other than the above, the best publications are by Larry Evers and Felipe Molina of Yaqui Deer songs , by Judith Vander of Shoshone Ghost dance songs , and by several people and me of Pima-Papago songs.

It is difficult to tell where the dream song tradition stopped or where it was absent in the American and Mexican west. It probably existed through northern Mexico, and it may not have existed, at least not have been important, among the Navajo, Apache, and the Pueblo.

Let us now take up the observations on Lightning and the Airplane songs. It is evident that Lightning is prose and song and Airplane is pure song.

It is not yet evident that the songs of Lightning do not make a story. We can make short work of this by noting the four songs that follow with prose intervals the one quoted above.

I defy the reader to make narrative sense of the sequence. He [who? He digs up the ground. He takes it [what? He stands it up, it is high, he takes it and stands it up.

The Lightning text is not faulty because its songs make no sense on their own. Rather, it is luxurious.

The person hearing them is supposed to know that the songs came from an eyewitness to myth, and a diligent hearer should learn, or know, the mythology.

What were the dances where dream songs were used, and is it true that the prose part of Lightning would not be recited at such an event?

The dances were always held out of doors in the night and were intended to last a full night.

They were held at village ceremonial grounds if these existed, otherwise at a convenient area between houses the villages were scattered with fields or scrub between houses , or at peoples' houses.

Manchmal kommt die Liebe einfach so Es gibt keinen Morgen danach Im Reigen der Gefühle Auf der Reise ins Licht Bonustitel: Friesen Hitmedley Ave Maria Heut sind so viele ganz allein Nur wer noch träumen kann Friesen Hitmedley: 1 Du fängst mich auf und lässt mich fliegen 2 Und morgen früh küss ich Dich wach 3 Mitten im Paradies Im Unterschied zum Album "Von hier bis unendlich" 1.

Track 5 "Einfach reden oder so" - Helene Fischer singt alleine; 2. Au4SwE-] found. Fantasie hat Flügel 2. Du hast mein Herz berührt 3.

Mitten im Paradies 4. So nah wie du 5. Hinter den Tränen 6. Du fängst mich auf und lässt mich fliegen 7.

Mut zum Gefühl 8. Das Karussell in meinem Bauch 9. Im Kartenhaus der Träume Zwischen Himmel und Erde Und ich vermiss dich auch Schatten im Regenbogenland Ich glaub dir hundert Lügen Einfach reden oder so Duett mit Sean Reeves 6.

BPc1SI-] found. Und morgen früh küss' ich dich wach 2. Mitten im Paradies 5. Ich glaub' dir hundert Lügen 6.

Am Ende sind wir stark genug 7. Das Karusell in meinem Bauch 8. Tausend gute Gründe 9. Fantasie hat Flügel Ewig ist manchmal zu lang Hundert Prozent Part two - Bonus-Mix: Vergeben, vergessen und wieder vertrau'n Du fängst mich auf und lässt mich fliegen Von hier bis unendlich Lass' mich in dein Leben Von Null auf Sehnsucht Und ich vermiss' dich auch Compilations : Best of.

Du fängst mich auf und lässt mich fliegen 3. Feuer am Horizont 4. Ich glaub' dir hundert Lügen 5. Ich geb' nie auf Am Anfang war das Feuer 7.

Und ich vermiss' dich auch 8. Mitten im Paradies 9. Du hast mein Herz berührt Verlieb' dich nie nach Mitternacht Und morgen früh küss' ich dich wach Hundert Prozent Du lässt mich sein, so wie ich bin Frag' nicht - ich mag dich Allein im Licht 2.

Mitten im Paradies 3. Hundert Prozent 4. Villa in der Schlossallee 5. Ich lebe jetzt 6. Sehnsucht 7.

Tocka Sehnsucht 8. Für einen Tag 9. Farbenspiel des Winds Die Schöne und das Biest We Go Together Born To Hand Jive Golden Eye 2.

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Du hast mein Herz berührt 7. Ich will spüren, dass ich lebe 8. Ewig ist manchmal zu lang 9. I Will Always Love You Copilot Euphoria Phänomen August EAC extraction logfile from 1.

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Such texts are memorized at the level of the episode : the teller is sure to give the essential and true narrative facts, but there is no guarantee, or even intent, that the teller will repeat exactly the same words that were said in a previous telling.

The texts are paraphrased on each performance. One must say that this is a kind of memorization, but of episodes 6. To conclude : the principal genres of Native American oral literature fall into a scale of memorization.

Implicit in this is the idea that literature is precious. Only a small portion of what people in oral societies know and say is committed to literature.

One wonders, why those things? I have no answer, but only an approach to the question. We should think of the levels as shelves, and study them in interaction : why this into song and that into prose, and in this case what has dreaming to do with it?

The key documents relative to the exceptional, ancient time version of the dream culture are certain very long series of songs with accompanying prose.

There is only one complete written version of such a text, that is, a version with both the songs and the prose. It is a Yuma myth called Lightning that was taken down by A.

Halpern and excerpted for publication under the name of the singer, William Wilson Before we discuss that text and others like it Halpern kindly gave me a copy of the full version , I wish to introduce, interpret, and analyze a very short series from the Papago or Tohono O'odham singer John Lewis, of Gunsight Village, Arizona.

We will pay particular attention to the way that these proseless songs tell a story. They leave the story to the imagination of the hearer, or reader.

I believe that this was the norm for the region, which raises one more issue on norms and exceptions, whether and why a dreamed song series would have accompanying prose.

We will explore this by means of the Airplane and Lightning sets at the end of the paper. The songs are said to have been dreamed from overheard from an airplane, in the s.

Lewis did not dream them himself, but learned them from the dreamer while they both worked at farms near Gila Bend, Arizona.

Gila Bend is mentioned in the first song, for there was a small Army Air Corps training field there, which attracted the plane. Thus the series is of modern inspiration.

Its use, however, was traditional : it was danced to. On weekends the Indians in the farm labor camp would sing the songs and dance to them.

The Lightning songs were also danced to, as I believe were all dream song series 8. We will discuss these dances as narrative or literary performances at the end of the paper.

At intervals during the Airplane dances, Lewis said, the song dreamer passed out chocolates to his helpers. These were snacks, the occasion was lighthearted.

The idea was to imitate pilots who were understood to eat chocolate while flying, for alertness. Lewis said that there were many more songs than the three he remembered, but as we will see the three suggest an ordered whole.

Writing conventions. Before giving the songs I will explain my method for writing and translating them. Readers uninterested in technicalities can skip this section, which concerns how my method differs from standard musical practice.

The songs are freely but accurately translated in capital letters in the next section. Standard practice uses notes on a musical staff.

Vertical position on the staff indicates a sound's pitch, while a sound's duration is shown by the design of the notes half note, quarter note, etc.

A sound's articulate status what sort of vowel or consonant it is is shown with letters written beneath the musical staff.

If the sounds are translated into another language, that language e. Rather, the translation is written as a separate poem. The words are written as if spoken in prose, that is, in what Herzog called the " music of speech.

The standard method of song transcription uses the vertical location of notes on a staff to represent real tonal differences, but it does not use horizontal distance to represent duration.

The note designs " full, " " half, " etc give that information. Song phrases are indicated by measure bars. My method of writing songs shows temporal duration by the horizontal placement of syllables.

The syllables are deployed relative to evenly placed " beat marks " ictus points. But if this method has an advantage relative to duration, it also loses something.

It dispenses with notes and, in the transcription given here, with information on melody or tone. A standard notation with that information is given in an appendix written by J.

Richard Haefer. I thank him for doing what I could not notate the songs and for his consultations on the tonal contours of the songs' key metered zones.

Those zones are the most regulated portions of a song. Papago songs have lines of varying length, but each line has within it a highly regularized zone.

This portion or zone is defined in the first place by a pattern of apportioning syllables to beats. In the present set songs vary in this the pattern places three syllables over two beats as follows :.

Ideally, there are as many lines in a song as there are instances of the pattern. In fact it is not quite so simple, for there are nonmetrical matters to consider, and these usually give good reason to establish fewer lines than there are occurences of the pattern.

A line may have more than one occurence, but one of the instances, when all things are considered, will be judged the true key zone for that line.

The identification of the zones affects the writing of the songs : the zones are placed in vertical alignment. And since the lines themselves are of varying lengths, the column of zones makes a song appear cantilevered, with varying amounts of " unregulated " material deployed to the right and left of the column.

A comment is needed on the cultural reality of key zones and song lines. The Papagos say that a song has a " beginning " son , an " end " ku:g , and an internal point of " turning " nodag , the last referring to a kind of repetition where the repeated portion does not equal the fullest rendition of the song 9.

I do not think that they had or now have terms equivalent to the concepts of " line " and " key zone ". They are not unusual among tribal peoples in this regard.

Although lines are fundamental in all written ethnopoetic analyses " key zone " is my own concept , I have not heard of a native people with an explicit notion of the same.

These peoples clearly have terminologies suitable for creating, or dreaming, and learning and singing songs.

If they lack technical notions like line and key zone, this may be because they do not write their songs.

The songs. The beats of the key metered zone are marked with asterisks, the other beats have ictus points. See Appendix 2 for spelling conventions and Appendix 3 on native ordinary language versions and the translations.

Song 1. Ga mu ka li fo na je je we ame jede hi me da. Ga mu hi la wine je je we da mane yu nu ke. Native Ordinary and Literal English Renditions.

Am Aux[l sing, imperf] high goer,. Aux[l sing, imperf] I high goer. Gam hu Kalifona jewed amjed him, Away California land from go,.

Gam hu Kalifona jewed amjed him. Away California land from go. Gam hu Hila:wi jewed da:m hud, Away Gila Bend land above descend,.

Gam hu Hila:wi jewed da:m hud. Away Gila Bend land above descend. Song 2. Native Ordinary and Literal English Versions.

And Aux[l, sing, imperf] here come out and low go,. And Aux[l, sing, imperf] here come out and low go. Gam hu Aho du'ag da:m sikol him, Away Ajo mountain above circling go,.

Gam hu Aho du'ag da:m sikol him, Away Ajo mountain above circling go. Song 3. Sa poi ku ku na he si wode me me he.

Native Ordinary and Literal English versions. Mukul du'ag jewed hogid an ke:k, Mukul mountain earth edge there stand,. And Aux[i, sing, imperf] it reach.

And Auxfi, sing, imperf] it reach. Interpretation of story, analysis of means. We begin with a discussion of how the three songs in sequence assimilate a modern airplane into an established dream song rubric on shamanic journeying.

After the narrative analysis we discuss the role of the key zone in the songs : that it corresponds to a single grammatical adverbial and syntactic next-to-last category, and that it has a musical meter, rhyme, and tone identity.

Near Gila Bend was an air field where, as the first song says, planes landed on flights from California. The field still exists by this small desert town.

The mountain name probably preceded the town which dates from the turn of the century. Lewis's home is near the mountain and so perhaps was the home of the dreamer, but I have heard the mountain mentioned in Pima songs, dreamed from birds rather than airplanes.

The Pima singers were unfamiliar with the actual mountain. The " I " in this set is an airplane that started from California, flew to and descended at Gila Bend, and then flew to and circled above Ajo Mountain.

Finally in the last song the plane flies to a destination that I believe no waking person has seen, and whose very name, Mukul, I have not heard interpreted in Pima-Papago or translated into English.

According to Lewis the mountain is at the edge of the world in a southeasterly direction from Ajo Mountain. This puts it in roughly the same orientation to Ajo Mountain as that mountain is to Gila Bend.

The song says that a fire burns at Mukul's tip, and the plane arrives there. The fire, Lewis says, is an airplane beacon.

Each line of each song is a complete sentence, simple or complex. The set has a total of 16 lines, but there are really only eight different ones because each line.

Almost every line ends in a verb. There is one more verb out of the final position. Song 2's duplicated first line is a sentence with two clauses.

The line ends with " go ", but begins with a clause whose verb is " come out ". Also concerning the verbs, we see that the eighteen verbal positions are filled with just seven verbs : " am ", " go ", " descend ", " come out ", " stand ", " burn ", and " reach ".

Margot Astrov her special interest was the Navajo long ago noted the prevalence of such words in Native American literatures.

Finally on the verbs, note that the exceptional first line of song 1 ends with a play on the verb " go ". Immediately before the final verb comes the key metered zone.

It is regularly filled by an adverb. Some of these are paired with nouns to form adverbial phrases the adverbial words are then called " post positions " — Zepeda, : : " earth from, " " earth upon, " " mountain upon ", and " earth beside ".

One adverb is hidden but implied in an auxiliary plus a pronoun song 3, roughly speaking " and I to it ".

And four are normal, simple adverbs : " high ", " low ", " circling ", and " flaming ". There is one more syntactical position in this set's formula.

Prior to the noun phrase and at the start of each line is an auxiliary, either a " subject complex word " see the appendix on translation or a " locative auxiliary.

What is notable about this syntactic form? First, it is not required by Papago ordinary language. In fact, the one strict rule that has been formulated for ordinary Papago word order is that a subject complex auxiliary must always occur in second position in a sentence Zepeda, : The set's formula violates that rule.

When its sentences have auxiliaries, they come in the first position. This is surely not the only syntactic sequence that occurs in Papago and Pima songs these are the same people linguistically and musically , but the range of these sequences is not known.

The sole clear general principle of the people's songs is that lines tend to end in verbs. Second, leaving aside what the songs regularly include, they are also notable for what they leave out.

They tend to leave out the grammatical subjects of their sentences and therefore the identities of the actors or heroes of their stories.

Thus, although these three songs are heavy with nouns, the nouns are not the subjects of sentences or the doers of actions.

Rather, the nouns name things or places that the. Song 3 is a partial exception. It has a substantive noun " Mukul mountain " 10 as its subject.

It ends, however, with the familiar brief " I. Almost all the verbs are intransitive, thus they lack direct objects. The nouns are more loosely objects, however, being the travel destinations of the " I.

The three rules or tendencies combine to produce a subjective, action oriented, pictorial and shamanic poetry. The " I " is like a camera recording what it sees.

The point of the set, I think, is that the plane is like a shaman or medicine man because it reaches the edge of the world and finds something burning there.

Thus it is the last song that transforms the set from a merely amusing piece on airplanes into a piece on shamanism.

The songs used by Pima-Papago shamans for divination and curing generally feature first person journeys, and the journeys commonly involve light Russell, : : ; Underbill, : ; Bahr, and Here is an example, also preoccupied with flying, from John Lewis :.

It is little winged turtle and here descends. It is little winged turtle and here descends,. Here to me stretches, away eastward leads me.

Here to me stretches, away eastward leads me,. Here to me stretches, away children's burial inside I enter,.

The " east " refers to the land of the dead, the children's burial is the place of a mythic child sacrifice.

The " I, " either a ghost or a shaman, is illuminated after entering that underground place Bahr, We turn now to the music, with special attention to the key zones.

Metrically this zone approximately corresponds to the instances where three syllables are apportioned over two beats full beat, then two half beats.

There are twelve such instances within the zone four times the zone has exceptional four syllable apportionments : lines 3 and 4 of song 1, and 1 and 2 of song 3 ; and there are 12 occurences outside it.

Eight of the exceptions are contiguous with the zone songs 2 and 3 , and we may say that they mimic it. I cannot explain the other four.

The key zone comprises a column of controlled phonetic variation, in other words of rhyme. There is no doubt that the words that occupy the zone have been modified from ordinary speech for the sake of rhyme.

The key zone of song 2 is the clearest example n. The first syllables do not rhyme, but the last two do.

The second syllable is a stack of " ma's, " and the third has the constant vowel " e " with differences in consonants.

The ordinary language sources of these words are jumal and da:m, a two and a one syllable word. The initial syllables of those words are kept true, but the final syllables are rhymed.

Is the key zone the prime locus for rhyming? I suspect that. Now tone. More often than not, the key zone, if of three syllables, has the tonal configuration Hi Lo Hi ; and if the zone has four syllables the configuation is Hi Hi Lo Hi.

Although the absolute pitch values vary from line to line see Haefer's musical notation in the appendix , the Hi's in each instance are of the same pitch, so the configuration is a pitch, a drop, and a resumption of the original pitch.

This pattern holds for twelve of the sixteen key zones, and it occurs four times outside a zone. If the key zone is musically distinct, it is also pinpointed.

Therefore we should not expect it to capture the full play of linguistic meaning in a song. As we have seen, the key zone consists of adverbs, but these are not what make the narratives interesting.

In my opinion, the narratives are interesting because of their concealed first personness, their supression of grammatical subject nouns, and the suggestion of shamanism.

Those complexities are not contained in the key zones. Nor could they be. The key zones, while meaningful, are not poems. They attest to memorization but they do not hold the secret of a text.

This is the story of one hero's journeying, generally in the company of three other individuals one of whom dreamed the songs. The dreamer, who was the singer William Wilson's father, is not mentioned in the text.

Wilson explained to Halpern that his father was present as a silent witness and over hearer of the songs. Wilson's prose then is a paraphrase of his father's prose account of what happened, but the songs that Wilson sang are taken as the exact words sung by the mythical hero, named Wonder Boy.

He becomes thunder and lightning at the end of the story. Also present during parts of the journey, but silent, are Coyote and Marxo Kwave untranslated , the orignal ancestor not creator of the Yuma.

Each of the songs supposedly originated in the journey. Thus the text qualifies as an exception by the fourth criterion stated at the beginning of the paper — new songs — but not by the third — new myth.

I say this because Wonder Boy observed and sang about mythic events that the Yumas already knew ; he came upon them and burst into song.

In so doing he was as much an observer as the dreamer whom he guided and sang to. He did not affect the events, or analyze them, but simply acknowledged them as the following example will illustrate.

An important event in Yuma mythology is the death and cremation of a creator god named Kukumat. Here with brackets by me and parentheses by Halpern is a part of the event as rendered in Lightning.

First comes prose, then a song :. Thus saying [by the dying god Kukumat], " I have finished the story " he is saying.

Now he is really about to take a turn for the worse [die], and has he [Wonder Boy] is looking at him there, " Well, I will admit my fail ure , " he [Kukumat] said, then the sick man [K] said, " Well, I am about to pass away.

Come really closer [said to all the creatures assembled, including the journeyers], surround me and look at me!

And he [WB] stood there describing it again [singing a song for the dreamer to hear]. Halpern, n. The Lightning text is not a new myth in the sense of a new or revised insight into the foundation events of the Yuma.

It is an old myth revisited and commented upon by Wonder Boy for a Yuma dreamer's benefit. The text's plot as a whole is quite like the much shorter Airplane series : a hero and his entourage travel and the hero sings songs in the process.

The prose part lacking in the Papago mostly tells where the hero moved next. Conclusion : Myth and Dream Song. This final section reflects on the facts that the Lightning songs, while giving testimony of a dreamed visit to mythic time, deliver that testimony in a mixture of prose and song ; that the Airplane songs, giving testimony to a lesser feat of the soul, tell their story in pure song ; that for all their brevity the Papago songs tell more of a story than the Yuma songs alone, that is, the Yuma songs when stripped of their prose ; and that beneath those differences there lies a common use for dream songs, to sing them at dances with no prose explanation.

In this use the Yuma songs make no textual sense. They only make if one knows the prose : that of the dreamer and that of the myths that he walked in on.

Before we begin, I will review the extent of ancient myth dreaming in the region. It is not reported elsewhere, and I doubt that it has been missed.

Kroeber published the prose portions of many such Mojave myths, but he omitted the songs , William Kelly published the prose but not the songs of a Cocopa myth of this sort As for dream songs of the normal sort, from peoples other than the above, the best publications are by Larry Evers and Felipe Molina of Yaqui Deer songs , by Judith Vander of Shoshone Ghost dance songs , and by several people and me of Pima-Papago songs.

It is difficult to tell where the dream song tradition stopped or where it was absent in the American and Mexican west. It probably existed through northern Mexico, and it may not have existed, at least not have been important, among the Navajo, Apache, and the Pueblo.

Let us now take up the observations on Lightning and the Airplane songs. It is evident that Lightning is prose and song and Airplane is pure song.

It is not yet evident that the songs of Lightning do not make a story. We can make short work of this by noting the four songs that follow with prose intervals the one quoted above.

I defy the reader to make narrative sense of the sequence. He [who? He digs up the ground.

He takes it [what? He stands it up, it is high, he takes it and stands it up. The Lightning text is not faulty because its songs make no sense on their own.

Rather, it is luxurious. The person hearing them is supposed to know that the songs came from an eyewitness to myth, and a diligent hearer should learn, or know, the mythology.

What were the dances where dream songs were used, and is it true that the prose part of Lightning would not be recited at such an event?

The dances were always held out of doors in the night and were intended to last a full night. They were held at village ceremonial grounds if these existed, otherwise at a convenient area between houses the villages were scattered with fields or scrub between houses , or at peoples' houses.

They were always communal, that is, were attended by a throng, not merely by members of one family. They were held for mourning, for girls' puberty, to await the return of ghosts the Ghost dance of the Shoshone and Paiute was of this tradition , to celebrate good harvests and war victories, and to celebrate paydays and American holidays such as Memorial Day or the Fourth of July.

As Kroeber remarked, the same series could be sung at most of the events that a community celebrated : They were generalized celebrations like the American " party.

The dancing was sometimes in circles and sometimes in straight lines, but it was always popular, mass dancing It included both men and women.

Whoever came, could dance and could join in the singing while dancing. There was teasing and lovemaking. If public speaking occured at a dance, it was admonitory on behavior, not explanatory on the stories behind the songs.

One did not seek or receive such explanations at a dance, but later at the singer's house. In fact, private houses are where all prose mythology was told.

There was no central authority over mythology and in reality no institutionalzed public prose. Songs and the middle memorized range of chant were used in public, prose in private.

Few such dances have been observed by anthropologists. I know of just four published observations of dances of the tradition, two of Yaqui Deer dances Wilder, ; Evers and Molina, and two of Pima-Papago Circle or Skipping dances Haefer, Kozak, Those four contain the only listings of songs that were actually sung at a dance.

We will return to the song lists below after first commenting on the story telling present in the Airplane songs : the story of a single hero, an " I " who is an airplane who mimics a shaman.

Now, one can say this story demands outside, contextual information equal to that demanded by the Lightning songs.

One must know that medicine men seek light and must be familiar with the mountain names. I say that there is a difference.

These songs build a small, ordered set of statements with knowledge that thoughtful adults should have. The Lightning songs on the other hand, as nearly as I can tell, do not make sense unless one has the prose connectives and long backgound myths.

Simply, the Airplane songs are a poem and the Lightning songs are not. They are a boast. We close on the matter of the song lists of dances.

I never saw an Airplane dance but I am sure that the three songs we have treated would not be sufficient for a whole night. As noted earlier, Lewis said that the dreamer knew many more songs.

What we have from Lewis, then, is a selection, a picked medley, and one picked I am sure for their self contained rhyme and reason as one poem.

Now, if the three songs are too few for a dance, the 1 1 8 Lightning songs are too many. My experience from a handful of Pima-Papago dances suggests that from 20 to 50 songs would fill a normal night's program.

Wilson told Halpern that he regularly sang the first 37 songs in summer dances and the first 64 in the winter when the nights are long.

These were for dances at funerals. The implication is of a fixed sequence that he could never complete, except at home.

Related to this, I have written a paper on a Pima singer who knew upwards of Swallow songs dreamed from that bird. The singer was repeatedly recorded during three hour " sings " at an Indian nursing home where dancing was only a memory.

The average session was about 30 songs. Am Ende sind wir stark genug 8. Solang dein Herz noch für mich schlägt 9. Manchmal kommt die Liebe einfach so Es gibt keinen Morgen danach Im Reigen der Gefühle Auf der Reise ins Licht Bonustitel: Friesen Hitmedley Ave Maria Heut sind so viele ganz allein Nur wer noch träumen kann Friesen Hitmedley: 1 Du fängst mich auf und lässt mich fliegen 2 Und morgen früh küss ich Dich wach 3 Mitten im Paradies Im Unterschied zum Album "Von hier bis unendlich" 1.

Track 5 "Einfach reden oder so" - Helene Fischer singt alleine; 2. Au4SwE-] found. Fantasie hat Flügel 2. Du hast mein Herz berührt 3. Mitten im Paradies 4.

So nah wie du 5. Hinter den Tränen 6. Du fängst mich auf und lässt mich fliegen 7. Mut zum Gefühl 8. Das Karussell in meinem Bauch 9.

Im Kartenhaus der Träume Zwischen Himmel und Erde Und ich vermiss dich auch Schatten im Regenbogenland Ich glaub dir hundert Lügen Einfach reden oder so Duett mit Sean Reeves 6.

BPc1SI-] found. Und morgen früh küss' ich dich wach 2. Mitten im Paradies 5. Ich glaub' dir hundert Lügen 6.

Am Ende sind wir stark genug 7. Das Karusell in meinem Bauch 8. Tausend gute Gründe 9. Fantasie hat Flügel Ewig ist manchmal zu lang Hundert Prozent Part two - Bonus-Mix: Vergeben, vergessen und wieder vertrau'n Du fängst mich auf und lässt mich fliegen Von hier bis unendlich Lass' mich in dein Leben Von Null auf Sehnsucht Und ich vermiss' dich auch Compilations : Best of.

Du fängst mich auf und lässt mich fliegen 3. Feuer am Horizont 4. Ich glaub' dir hundert Lügen 5. Ich geb' nie auf Am Anfang war das Feuer 7.

Und ich vermiss' dich auch 8. Mitten im Paradies 9. Du hast mein Herz berührt Verlieb' dich nie nach Mitternacht Und morgen früh küss' ich dich wach Hundert Prozent Du lässt mich sein, so wie ich bin Frag' nicht - ich mag dich Allein im Licht 2.

Mitten im Paradies 3. Hundert Prozent 4. Villa in der Schlossallee 5. Ich lebe jetzt 6. Sehnsucht 7.

Tocka Sehnsucht 8. Für einen Tag 9. Farbenspiel des Winds Die Schöne und das Biest We Go Together Born To Hand Jive Golden Eye 2. Nur wer den Wahnsinn liebt 3.

Nicht von dieser Welt 4. Das Karussell in meinem Bauch Instrumental 5. Halleluja 6. Du hast mein Herz berührt 7. Ich will spüren, dass ich lebe 8.

Ewig ist manchmal zu lang 9. I Will Always Love You Copilot Euphoria Phänomen

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